Gender Politics – Has the Industry Gone Too Far?

Categorized as Alleged Conflict of Interest, Alleged Racism & Discrimination, Community Posts Tagged

ACE Producers:

Torino Film Lab staff page:

Cannes’ Residency Fall 2023:

The Israeli Film Fund social media banner:

Has gender politics in the film industry, mirroring society as a whole, has gone too far in correcting historical injustices, and is de facto engaged in illegal discrimination on the basis of gender, race and other physical characteristics? We’ve already touched on the subject here.

Historically, traditional liberalism pursued a society indifferent to race and color, focusing on individual merit and abilities.

People were encouraged to do their best, whoever they were, in a promise that society will treat them as equals, legally and otherwise. We were educated and told to be blind to people’s gender and race.

In the West, this has been the case since about 1970s, and for over 50 years. (Developing countries, and lower social and economic communities in the West, are completely excluded from this discussion.)

While traditional liberalism encouraged people to look at others as equal human beings rather than a mathematical sum of their gender + race + sexual orientation + nationality and other attributes they were born with, in 2020’s we have reverted to a place where people and their opportunities have been reduced to their identity, similar to the situation in Europe in the 1930’s:

For the past five years, white, straight, male writers and directors with experience and successful track records have been sidelined. We’ve essentially been told that because of our race and gender, we need not apply.

This may not be obvious at first glance. There sure seemed to be a lot of white dudes at the Golden Globes, right? Well, this doesn’t impact the top 2% of writers, showrunners, and directors since they’re in the rarified air where they get work no matter what.

And the saddest part of all this is that most of the people who would fill that room are some of the most liberal people I know—people who have gone out of their way to foster new and unique voices.

Anonymous letter – A VETERAN SCREENWRITER’S PLOT TWIST ON HOLLYWOOD’S DEI CULTURAL SHIFT – filmthreat.com

It’s crucial to distinguish ‘equality of opportunity’ from ‘equality of outcome.’ The latter suggests enforcing uniform outcomes through reverse discrimination with disregard to merit or personal abilities. This approach, which imposes “top-down” equality, masks the underlying issues of society, in education, the distribution of economic resources, etc, rather than addressing them directly.

This process is done with an extreme invasion to personal information and privacy, when people everywhere are now forced to expose data that they otherwise might not want to make public.

By focusing on superficial equality of outcome, it treats the symptoms rather than the root causes and promotes further division, discrimination and as a side effect, degrading of artistic output.

Some critics have labeled it as the ‘exclusion of POT’, that is, the exclusion of People of Talent, to the detriment of the industry, audiences, and society as a whole.

This phenomenon, socially violent and extreme, wide spread in society as whole, has unfortunately but expectedly, is now met with a backlash from the extreme Right of the political spectrum, with a huge increase in the support of extreme rightwing politicians everywhere, undermining and putting at risk the very existence of liberal democracies in the West, with Trump likely to win the next US presidential elections, along with other autocrats and fascists all over the world.

Film Industry Watch advocates for unequivocal equality of opportunity in both the film industry and society broadly. We believe every individual deserves equal treatment, irrespective of gender, race, sexual orientation, or other characteristics. We support nurturing equal opportunities from the outset, emphasizing enhanced education and financial assistance for underprivileged sectors and communities.

The images on the page were taken from: https://www.torinofilmlab.it/teams and other public sources.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *